Preview of Productive Macs - a New Productivity Bundle for Mac

"Please embargo the information provided below until the bundle launch on December 5th…." NO….

Unlike most Mac bundles that lack focus, Productive Macs is focused on productivity. We have hand-picked 8 premium productivity applications and bundled them together, available just for $39.99 - at an 85% discount from their original price!

The applications in Productive Macs bundle will help Mac users to greatly enhance their productivity. The included applications are best in their class and are widely known throughout the Mac user community:

Fantastical - The calendar you'll actually enjoy using
NoteBook - Powerful note taking and organizing
Default Folder X - Save your files effortlessly and open your folders instantly
Cashculator - The most productive way to track your finances
Home Inventory - Your stuff at your fingertips
BusyCal - The easy way to share your calendars and more.
LaunchBar - Everything on your Mac, few keystrokes away!
Tags - Manage your files in a way far superior to folders

The Productive Macs bundle will be launched on December 5th and run until December 19th.

Response to the above

From the company representative who sent me the above "embargoed" information:

I saw your article about our bundle at http://yourmaclifeshow.com/inthenews/2011/12/02/preview-productive-macs-....

Thanks for writing about us, but I couldn't miss the blatant disregard for my embargo request by putting it framed besides the article.

Is it something personal against me in particular or agains embargo requests in general? I thought that abiding by these requests is part of good journalism practice...

Best,
Kosta Rozen
http://www.apparentsoft.com

My Response

"I saw your article about our bundle at http://yourmaclifeshow.com/inthenews/2011/12/02/preview-productive-macs-....
Thanks for writing about us, but I couldn't miss the blatant disregard for my embargo request by putting it framed besides the article.
Is it something personal against me in particular or agains embargo requests in general?"

Personal against you? Not even a little bit. I'm sorry but I don't even know you or your company. As far as I know, we've never done business together and have no prior relationship. And yes - I am against unbidden, unasked for and unapproved embargo requests.

I was sent an email (one of hundreds I get a day) that simply assumed, without asking, that I would respect an embargo from a company for a product I've never heard of. I find that assumption offensive.

"I thought that abiding by these requests is part of good journalism practice..."

First of all, I'm not a journalist (and have never claimed to be) and therefore, probably not burdened by those practices but yes - when those requests are done properly and not jammed down the recipient's throat, we in the media are more than happy to agree to or disagree with an embargo. But it's *always* the journalist's choice. What you have done is taken way that choice with your presumptions.

What you did was the equivalent of me walking down the street and having someone come up to me and say, "Hey stranger! I'm going to tell you a big secret! Oh, and by the way, don't tell anyone I told you until I say it's OK!"

It's nothing personal about you, your company or your bundle and I have been very clear about this on the Your Mac Life show, on Twitter and in any conversations I've ever had with other public relations people. PR people send out these kinds of "embargoes" all the time for dozens of mickey mouse products and the purpose of an embargo has lost its power.

What PR people *should* do is ask in advance if the journalist in question would mind being constrained by a particular embargo. Wait for the response and then take the appropriate action. Maybe if we treat each other with more respect and fewer assumptions, we can work together to make embargoes mean something again.

I wish you much success with your bundle.
--
Shawn King
Host/Executive Producer
Your Mac Life
http://www.yourmaclifeshow.com

Dang.

I love the presumptions on their part. Reminds me a lot of the legal boilerplate I see on emails from certain institutions that stress the confidentiality of the email. Dude, you sent me an email without asking for my consent to keep it mum. By definition, it's no longer confidential.

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